Inward Blog

Employee Engagement and Internal Branding require a sequential framework and process. Without it your efforts will likely fail

This is the fourth submission in an 11-week series on how to launch an employee engagement program. Last week I spoke about setting clear goals and objectives. In this post I will discuss the importance of following a codified sequential framework and process.

Posted by Allan Steinmetz at 11:00am

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It’s My Decision And I Stand By It!

Leaders are faced with making decisions every day that have consequences impacting themselves, their companies, and those they lead. How leaders make decisions and how they deal with the consequences of those decisions has a direct impact on their ability to engage and inspire others. Some of those decisions end up with very positive outcomes. But often, even with the best intentions and best intelligence available, decisions are made that end up with less than desirable results. Effective leaders understand that there is no decision that is 100% risk free. There is always one more piece of information that could be reviewed before making a decision. There are those who make impulsive decisions with little or no input and there are those who analyze information to death and do not make decisions in a timely manner. Effective leaders find the balance between making a quick decision and considering intelligence and input before making that decision.

Posted by Rick DeMarco at 11:00am

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Setting Clear And Measurable Objectives To Create Internal Brand Alignment

This is the third submission in an 11-week series on how to launch an employee engagement program. Last week I spoke about understanding your internal audience and how to conduct internal research. In this post I will discuss how to set clear and measurable goals and objectives.

Posted by Allan Steinmetz at 3:00am

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The Team With The Best Players Doesn't Always Win

Is it possible to have a team of very high performers and yet not be a high performing organization?  It happens all the time, in sports and in the business world. How many times have you watched a ball game where a roster of highly talented players can’t seem to work together to win the game? Similarly, how many organizations do you know with an extremely talented leadership team, and yet they consistently fall short of expectations and goals? Individual talent alone is not enough to win in team sports, and in many ways, running a business is in fact a “team sport”.

Posted by Rick DeMarco at 11:00am

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Understanding Your Employees And Establishing Clear Goals And Objectives

This is the second submission in an 11-week series on how to launch an employee engagement program. Last week I spoke about finding and securing a budget. In this post I will discuss due diligence and the necessary steps for discovering and establishing clear goals and objectives.

Posted by Allan Steinmetz at 11:00am

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What Is The Most Important Role In An Effective Organization?

Let me cut to the chase and then explain. Every role within an organization is equally important. To be clear, I’m not talking about which role carries the most responsibility, which one has the most exposure, or which one establishes vision and strategy. I’m talking about which role is most important to the success of an organization. For an organization to reach its vision and goals, EVERYONE has to do their job. Senior leaders can develop the most compelling strategy and vision in their industry, but successful execution of that strategy depends on everyone in the organization buying into that vision. Creating a culture of high employee engagement requires everyone to do their job and do it well. It does no good to develop and manufacture a great product if the sales people don’t sell it, the logistics team doesn’t deliver it, and the accountant doesn’t bill and collect payment for it. 

Posted by Rick DeMarco at 11:00am

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New Blog Series: How to Effectively Launch an Employee Brand Engagement Program

Over the next 11 weeks I plan to share ideas that will provide insight on how to launch a compelling employee brand engagement program. I will cover budgeting, due diligence and discovery, identifying a clear strategy and goals, developing a sequential process to build momentum, how to create message architecture that is relevant, the WIIFM (what’s in it for me?), creative/visual representation of an idea, establishing recognition and reward systems and programs, program management, communication metrics and ROI, and finally how to create sustainability and building momentum.

Posted by Allan Steinmetz at 11:00am

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Have the Courage to be Uncomfortable So You Can Make Others Comfortable!

We get used to doing things a certain way and there is great comfort in that routine and stability.  The Myers Briggs Personality Type is a great assessment tool that helps leaders understand their natural behavioral tendencies.  There are sixteen different categories, that are based on determining if someone is an extravert or an introvert, whether they perceive and understand based on sensing or on intuition, whether they form judgments and make choices based on thinking or on feeling, and whether their actions are more based on planning or taking things as they come.   But understanding our natural tendencies is only the first step in exhibiting strong leadership that drives a culture of employee engagement and inspiration.

Posted by Rick DeMarco at 11:00am

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Lessons from Mad Men

I will admit straight off that I am a big fan of Mad Men. I lived that life when I started my career at McCann-Erickson in 1975 in Detroit as a media planner. McCann-Erickson was known as Coke’s and Exxon’s agency. With the encouragement of these two clients, McCann-Erickson expanded globally and had multiple offices around the world. I was proud to work for such an advertising conglomerate and leader in the industry. We didn’t have the historical trauma of the Kennedy assassination and the Cuban missile crisis. But we did have the Cold War, Watergate and the Nixon resignation and Vietnam.

Posted by Allan Steinmetz at 11:00am

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What Do You Really Know About The People You Lead?

One of the top issues facing senior leadership today is the lack of employee engagement among those they lead.  Research from a number of sources, including Gallup, Towers Watson, and Modern Survey all indicate that only about 30% of the workforce is fully engaged.  So how do you get people engaged? 

Posted by Rick DeMarco at 11:00am

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